banjo neck pattern

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November 29th, 2020

Look at the trueness of the width as well as the trueness of the thickness. Snug up the clamps and let it sit for a while. The ears are added The peghead overlay and fingerboard are added. For the neck, choose stock a couple of inches longer than the entire banjo and a tad wider than the section of the neck that extends into the rim. Your email address will not be shared. If your peg head is to be wider than that dimension, add the length of a second peg head to the overall length of the neck blank. Plan to leave out the ugly stuff. If it does not, use the jointer to make one edge flat and straight. Learn how your comment data is processed. Get the surfaces of the workpieces that the fingerboard will be glued to as even as possible. Test the trueness of your workpieces against the jointer bed or some other surface that is very flat and straight. Before ripping the board check to make sure that your workpiece has a straight edge on it. Is it fairly even and level? Banjo Intermediate. The scale length of the instrument determines how long the neck should be. Look at the lumber again. Get the c-clamps ready by opening them up to accommodate the thickness of the workpiece. Are there twists or warps you did not see before? You will automatically be entered for a chance to win BanjoCraft Giveaways! Subscribe with confidence! Tap it. This pattern can be made from thin material, like plexi-glass, thin plywood, or even cardboard. Holographic Universe Slide Show.pps format: Start with a board that is at least 1.25″ thick  and 3.25″ wide in the rough. In the case of a two piece neck, cut two pieces to 27″ or so long. See more ideas about banjo, inlay, string instruments. The thickness I aim for down by the heel is usually around 1 to 1 and 1/4 inches. If you choose to accent the glue joint, spread glue on the mating surfaces of both workpieces. Click on the pictures for larger view. Your email address will not be shared. Do they match up pretty good? Trouble playing videos? June Apple and other Favorites by Bob Browder, How to Make a Banjo Neck Pattern – Side Profile. Look across the board to see if it has any “cup”. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Next, look at the surfaces that will become the front profile, the sides intended to be the gluing surface for the fingerboard. If there is a small gap it may be possible to close it with a clamp and some more glue. Do you see any irregularities? More durable materials will provide a longer useful life. Unlock the Banjo Neck with Patterns Intro. The last thing to mark is the radius that joins the heel and the back of the neck. Spread the glue onto the mating surface of one of the workpieces. Banjo neck blank preparation begins with the choice of suitable wood. This can be a slippery operation so having a friend on hand can be helpful. 20 degrees is typical of the majority of pre-war Mastertone banjos! Learn how your comment data is processed. Added 11 days ago. Lay the neck pattern on the lumber and look at it. Gibson peghead angle above about 20.4 degrees. A live demonstration on jointer safety from a wood working professional is highly recommended. It’s pretty easy to freehand this. I usually start at the peghead with a thickness of about 3/4 of an inch. The neck side profile template I used back in the late 1960s and through out the 70s was 19.5 degrees. Take care to set the jointer cut to be very light at first. Look down the length of the board and try to identify any warps or irregularities. If you have a great piece of wood that is 26″ go for it. The neck gets thicker towards the heel. Use a compass if you wish. Even from the same board if possible. Look down the length of the board and try to identify any warps or irregularities. Think it over a little. Starting at the peghead, mark a line that connects it with the heel. Examine the glue joint. Banjo Neck Side Profile Pattern In its most basic representation the banjo neck side profile pattern consists of three rectangles; one for the peghead, one for the neck, and one for the heel. Joint one face and two edges of the stock. Check your progress between each pass on the jointer. Lay the pattern on the workpieces again. They should be as level with each other as possible, although they will likely have to be trued on the jointer after gluing them together. Put the workpieces together. If you plan to accent the glue joint with a veneer, get it ready. How to Make a Banjo Neck Step-By-Step Workpieces are trued on the jointer Gluing (if two piece neck) The side profile is cut out, then the neck blank is left to cure a while. Jun 15, 2019 - Explore DBT's board "Banjo Inlay Pattern", followed by 150 people on Pinterest. Plan to stagger the placement of the clamps so that pressure will be applied evenly. Scribbling on the surface to be trued with a pencil is a handy technique that will allow you to see where the jointer is hitting and where it is not. Using the line that represents the peghead as a starting point, mark a rectangle about 3/8″-1/2″ thick, this makes the peghead part of the pattern. More durable materials will provide a longer useful life. Look across the board to see if it has any “cup”. Most all lumber needs to be trued, so do that with the jointer now. Begin by putting a clamp on one end, tightening a little bit, aligning and tightening some more. Mark a straight line that is the intended length of the fingerboard. Hold it. Take a look down the fingerboard face of the workpiece. Go to the opposite end of the line that represents the fingerboard and make another straight line at 90 degrees perpendicular to the fingerboard line. Click Here and read "Playing Videos" … Subscribe with confidence! Tap it. If the ends are uneven, trim them with a saw. The banjo neck used in this example was already shaped and the heel wasn’t cut at all. How to Make a Banjo Neck Pattern – Side Profile This pattern can be made from thin material, like plexi-glass, thin plywood, or even cardboard. Work your way down the workpiece adjusting as necessary. Lay the neck pattern on the lumber and look at it. From Fine Woodworking #53 Take a good long look at your lumber before you begin. True at least three sides, the side that will be the back of the workpiece need not be trued because it will be carved away. Think on it some more. I sometimes prefer to make the neck and rim from the same wood. Think it over a little. You will automatically be entered for a chance to win BanjoCraft Giveaways! Do the gluing faces fit together solidly? Add between 5 and 7 inches to accommodate for the length of the peghead. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. I usually aim for three. This is important to the long-term life of the neck so take your time and look it over really good. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. This pattern is intended to be used with a traditional dowel stick design. Also, consider the rim and whether there is enough lumber to make both a rim and a neck. True the sides. Starting at the line that represents the depth of the heel, make another mark at 90 degrees that goes back towards the peghead. GIBSON PEGHEAD NECK ANGLE. After the glue has had a chance to set remove the clamps and take a look. In fact, this banjo neck was made by me in my shop and the heel was hand cut by me specifically for this article. Theoretically this could go on orever, but the frets would get awfully close together and your fat fingers wouldn’t fit anyway, so the clever designers of the banjo decided enough was enough and ended the neck at around fret number 22 (some banjos have a few more or a few less than 22 frets).

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